London Classic Car Show – Top 10 in 2021

16th Jun, 2021 | Blog Articles, Classic Cars

The London Classic Car Show is the annual celebration that brings classic cars together with owners, collectors and car connoisseurs who are ready to purchase. The best chance to view some of the finest and rarest classic cars in the calendar, the show is also a popular time to sell certain makes and models. 2021’s show is particularly special; not only does it represent a return to live outdoor Covid-compliant events, but 2021 also marks 135 years of the motor car.

This year’s show includes cars that reflect the motorcars timeline, from the 1893 Salvesen Steam Car, Scotland’s very first car, to 80s and 90s Brutalism and a look at some of the rally-influenced autos of the time.

Let’s take a look at 10 of the best that you can expect in 2021…

The London Classic Car Show 2021 has created a chronologically focused programme, with an emphasis on time over brands. This helps to highlight the focus of the time, from the looks of the 1930s to the endurance of the key makes and models of the 1960s and 70s and beyond.

 

1. Bugatti Brescia

This year marks 100 years of Bugatti success, with the passing of a century since the Bugatti Type 13 took the top 1-2-3-4 spots at the Brescia Grand Prix. Founded in 1909 by Ettore Bugatti, it took over a decade for the cars to really get up to speed. With such a historic win under his belt, Bugatti designated the Type 13 the Bugatti Brescia, with just 2000 produced in the years to 1926. These models are now reaching almost half a million at auction.

 

2. Rolls Royce Phantom II 1930

Looking back to the 1930s, the motor car was all about smooth styles and subtle elegance. The timeless – and peerless- Rolls Royce Phantom II 1930 will be on display at Syon Park.

 

3. Cadillac Coupe de Ville

Heading to America for our next top 10 car, the Cadillac Coupe de Ville will be on display. First produced in 1949, the Coupe De Ville became intrinsically linked with luxury across the next two decades.

 

4. Corvette Stingray

The Corvette Stingray has come to represent the ‘American Dream’ on wheels. Wrapped up in rock’n’roll, the slicked back, sleek Stingray has been considered an iconic car of the 1950s and 1960s.

 

5. Jaguar E-Type

The Jaguar E-Type is now 60 and where better to mark this than at Syon Park with a stunning display of the Series 1, Series 2 and Series 3 models, as well as two cars who are so revered that they are known by their number plates alone – ECD 400 and 49 FXN. The ECD 400, driven by Graham Hill, stormed to victory at Oulton Park, while the 49 FXN was one of only two low drag coupe bodies of the lightweight E-Type models produced in 1963 to cope with the demands of Le Mans.

 

6. Porsche 935 1978

Long distancing racing was where it was at in the 1960s and 70s, both at Le Mans and Daytona. The Porsche 935 1978 was developed with the intention that it would only be driven at Le Mans. With new rules, the floor pan was cut to place the exhaust system at the front of the engine. With its white color and long tail shape to optimise the low drag, the 935 1978 was nicknamed the Moby-Dick.

 

7. McLaren M12 1969

The McLaren M12 1969 was produced by Bruce McLaren Motor Racing in 1969 ‘for an assault on Le Mans’, but McClaren could not get the car accepted by the FIA and the M12 didn’t race at Le Mans. The M12 went on to become the first ‘road-legal’ McLaren.

 

8. 2002 Tii

2021 marks the 50th anniversary of the 2002 Tii; launched in 1971, the 2002 Tii set the tone for the BMW’s sporty saloons that we see on our roads still. With a fuel-injected 2-litre engine, the 2002 Tii’s top speed of 118mph was slowed down with its wider tyres and bigger brakes.

 

9. Cheetah

From the same era, but a car that has more heart than most, comes the Cheetah. Possibly worth the trip for the Cheetah alone, this car was made in such small numbers (reputed to be just 23) that it was never classified as a production car. Created as competition to the Ford-powered Cobra, the Cheetah recoded an unofficial Daytona speed of 215 mph, smashing the Cobra’s 135mph best.

 

10. The Lancia Lambda

Last, but certainly not least, comes the Lancia Lambda. Revolutionising car design, its unibody became the basis for global car manufacturing and it became one of the first cars to feature brakes on all four wheels. It is a hundred years since founder, Vincenzo Lancia, took his prototype to the Mont Cenis Pass, between France and Italy, to put it to the test.

 

Show Timings for The London Classic Car Show 2021

Friday 25th June: 10am – 6pm
Saturday 26th June: 10am – 7pm
Sunday 27th June: 10am – 6pm

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© 2021 Suros Capital – all rights reserved. Suros Capital is a trading name of Hopkins & Jones Limited who are authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Firm reference number 731198. Hopkins & Jones Limited is registered in England under company number 433606. Registered office: 88 Fleet Street, London EC4Y 1DH. VAT number: 238 8280 37.

 

 

© 2020 Suros Capital – all rights reserved. Suros Capital is a trading name of Hopkins & Jones Limited who are authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Firm reference number 731198. Hopkins & Jones Limited is registered in England under company number 433606. Registered office: 88 Fleet Street, London EC4Y 1DH. VAT number: 238 8280 37.